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General Assistance Program (GAP)

EPA

Assistance may be provided under this program only for activities which the agency determines are appropriate to carry out the purposes of the Indian Environmental General Assistance Program Act of 1992, Public Law 102-497, Section 11, 42 USC 4368B, as amended, Public Law 103-55.

The annual Indian General Assistance Program (GAP), funded by the Environmental Protection Agency, offers aid to federally-recognized tribes in the amount of $75,000.00 to $130,000 for the development of a Tribal Environmental/Capacity Building Program.

The primary purpose of these assistance agreements is to support the developmental elements of a core environmental program.

2011 Work Plan Deliverables Completed
v  Compiled and submitted annual report to EPA.

v  Prepared 20 grant applications to build Tribal capacity.

v  Performed inventory of Environmental equipment.

v  Maintained current and complete QA documentation.

v  Managed cost accounts for all grants.

v  Developed land management maps utilizing GPS/GIS.

v  Attended numerous training sessions in the Environmental field.           .

v  Participated in RTOC meetings.

v  Attended National and Regional meetings.

v  Attended Tar Creek Conference planning meetings

v  Attended Tar Creek Conference

v  Participated in Tar Creek Conference presentation

v  Updated GIS/GPS-QAPP

v  Attended NEPA training

v  Attended Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) meetings.

v  Attended NATURE meetings.

v  Attended special meetings regarding the Tar Creek Superfund Site.

v  Attended the Tri-State Partnership Meeting.

v  Provided outreach to Tribes on meetings attended.

v  Selected and managed the remediation for two dump sites.

v  Environmental Director supervised following programs: CWA 106, CAA 103, Water 319, Fish and Wildlife, Pesticides, General Assistance Program, Water Resources Wetland, Fish Hatchery Maintance, Fish Hatchery Operations, Noxious Weeds USDA-RBOG/Fish Hatchery, Chronic Wasting Disease and NRDAR.

2012Anticipated Activities

v  Compile and prepare annual report.

v  Prepare six or more grants to build Tribal capacity.

v  Maintain current and complete QA documentation.

v  Attend four or more selected training sessions.

v  Perform inventory of Environmental equipment.

v  Manage cost accounts for all grants...

v  Purchase and procure laboratory equipment.

v  Participate in RTOC meetings.

v  Attend the Tri-State Partnership Meeting.

v  Attend Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) meetings.

v  Attend NATURE meetings.

v  Clean up two solid waste sites

Water Resources

BIA

The primary purpose of this grant is to evaluate Tribal water needs, identify completed and ongoing water planning efforts by the State of Oklahoma and other entities that may impede on Tribal water resources, and to evaluate various strategies, such as establishing Tribal water quality criteria, to protect and enhance Tribal water resources.

Task 1: Future Water Demand Estimation

         Subtask A: Project estimated future Tribal population and geographic distribution patterns of Tribal members and that of the general population in the study area through 2030 in annual increments.

              Subtask B: Project estimated future water use by Tribal members and that of the general population in the study area through 2030 in annual increments.

         Subtask C: Project estimated future water use by non-public-supply users in the study area through 2030 in annual increments.

Task 2: Current Water Supply Assessment

         Subtask A: Identify existing public supply water systems and domestic water systems and domestic well use in the study area that are relied upon by Tribal members and by the general population; describe the systems' geographic locations and correlate them to water users identified in Task 1.

             Subtask B: Assess capacity of existing public supply water systems and domestic well use in the study area that are relied upon by Tribal members and by the general population.

         Subtask C: Correlate water system capacities identified in Subtask B of this Task with future water demand estimated in Task 2 and determine anticipated timeframe of water supply deficit and project estimated gross and net water demand through 2030 in annual increments.

Task 3: Current Water Supply Assessment

             Subtask A: Identify existing public supply water systems and domestic well use in the study area that are relied upon by Tribal member and by the general population; describe the systems' geographic locations and correlate them to water users identified in Task 1.

             Subtask B: Assess capacity of existing public supply water systems and domestic well use in the study area that are relied upon by Tribal members and by the general      population.

             Subtask C: Correlate water system capacities identified in Subtask B of this Task with future water demand estimated in Task 2and determine anticipated timeframe of water supply deficit and project estimated gross and net water demand through 2030 in annual increments.

Task 4: Water Resource Identification

             Subtask A: Inventory existing water resources in and adjacent to the study area. Categorize and list by source type (surface water- lake, surface water: - river,           groundwater, including pertinent aquifer characteristics.)

             Subtask B: Estimate potentially available water supply quantities from each resource:

             Listed in Subtask A of this Task. This will involve compiling available information from multiple resources (i.e., Oklahoma Water Resources Board, United States Geological Survey, US Army Corps of Engineers, etc.) And developing a water resource assessment specific to the Tribe's needs as characterized in this Scope of Work.

             Subtask C: Identify and describe necessary infrastructure improvements (i.e. pipelines, reservoirs, treatment plant, wells, etc.) To realize potential water supply benefits identified in Subtask B of this Task.

      Task 5: Water Supply Development Recommendations and Cost Estimation

             Subtask A: Estimate costs of water supply projects identified in Task 4, Subtask C. Cost estimates should include capital construction costs and operation and maintenance.  All Cost estimates should be presented as annual real costs and as unit costs amortized over the life of the project based on the water supply quantity provided by the project          (i.e., this pipeline and water treatment plant would reliably provide by the project 75,000 gallons per day and would cost $500,000 to design and construct; amortized over 30 Years at 8 percent interest yield a capital cost-benefit of $1.61/1,000 gallons.)

             Subtask B: Identify and describe environmental, political, and regulatory issues associated with each potential project identified in Task 4, Subtask C.

             Subtask C: Prioritize potential projects identified in Task 4, Subtask C, based on results of Subtasks A and B of this task.

            Subtask D: Develop a recommended configuration of water supply development projects from the highest ranked projects in Subtask C of the Task necessary to meet future demand.

All the goals were completed and addition to a test well to the Boone Aqufier in Dec. 2011.

CWA 106 Water Grant

EPA

The primary objective of this program is to establish a water program for the Peoria Tribe Environmental Department.  This grant enables the Environmental Department to perform water quality analysis of streams in Ottawa County and report the analysis to the EPA.

2011 Work Plan Deliverables Completed
v  Submitted a new CWA 106 grant for fiscal year  2012

v  Submitted quarterly reports to EPA.

v  Completed training opportunities to develop tribal capacity.

v  Provided articles for tribal newsletter for education/outreach.

v  Continued sampling on the Spring River, Tar Creek, Warren’s Branch, and Flint Branch.

v  Conducted Bio-Assessment.

~ 2012 Anticipated Activities ~
v  Provide quarterly reports that reflect the activities undertaken by the Tribe.

v  Compare and reconcile water quality data obtained with the data Quality objectives identified in the QAPP.

v  Continue the development of a Tribal clean water program.

v  Continue to conduct a baseline assessment for the Spring River, Tar Creek,  and Neosho River

v  Continue to conduct a Bio-Assessment in Tribal Jurisdictional waters.

Tribal Wildlife Grant

Fish and Wildlife Service

The overall purpose of these grants are to improve the water quality and wildlife in the streams located in Ottawa County. The primary purposes of these grants are to perform a small fish and mussel survey on our streams with a focus on endangered and threatened species and to rebuild the population of these species in the wild.

~2011 Grant Work Plan Deliverables Completed ~
v  Surveys have been conducted on the fish and mussels located on Peoria Tribal lands.

v  Basic water quality measurements have been collected.

v  Approximately 1.2 million Neosho Muckets have been reintroduced into the Spring and Neosho Rivers. Due to flood conditions that occurred during mussel brooding season, we were unable to obtain Rabbitsfoot stock for reintroduction.

v  We were successful in propagating Neosho Madtoms in our hatchery. We currently have 9 madtoms that are growing out into adult fish.

v  Currently the Peoria Tribe has 23 Neosho Madtoms in captivity and propagation work is being conducted.

v  We have successfully propagated Plain pocketbook mussels in our hatchery and have approx. 200 that are growing out in our bucket system.

~2012 Grant Work Plan Deliverables Anticipated ~
Freshwater Mussels
v  Collect appropriate species for artificial propagation techniques.

v  Propagate and grow out target species to demonstrate feasibility of production.

v  In consultation with USFWS, establish short and long-term production goals for freshwater mussel species of concern.

v  Monitor Neosho Mucket release sites in the Neosho and Spring rivers including quantifying the survival rate of these species.

v  Monitor of pertinent environmental conditions such as pH, dissolved oxygen, flow, etc.

Neosho Madtom
v  Expand techniques necessary to raise Neosho Madtoms in large enough quantities for potential future reintroduction.

v  Continue to monitor and quantify Neosho Madtom populations documented in previous Tribal Wildlife Grants that gave the tribe an initial baseline for this project.

v  Continue to revise our reintroduction plan in close consultation with the Kansas Ecological Services Field Office (service lead for the Neosho Madtom) and with the assistance of the Mark Wildhaber with the US Geological Survey, the Neosho National Fish Hatchery, and the Oklahoma Ecological Services Field Office.

v  Begin preliminary genetic work that will begin the process of indentifying genetic markers to determine different populations of Neosho Madtoms.

Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD)

USDA APHIS VS

Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) of deer, elk and moose. TSEs are caused by unusual infectious agents known as prions. To date, CWD has been found mainly in cervids (members of the deer family). First recognized as a clinical "wasting" syndrome in 1967 in mule deer in a wildlife research facility in northern Colorado, it was identified as a TSE in 1978 and has spread to a dozen states and two Canadian provinces. CWD is typified by chronic weight loss leading to death. There is no known relationship between CWD and any other TSE of animals or people. Although there have been reports in the popular press of humans being affected by CWD, a study by the Center for Disease Control (CDC) failed to find any relationship.  CWD has been detected in one commercial Elk herd in north-central Oklahoma.   Monitoring of the Oklahoma Whitetail deer population is ongoing to investigate the possibility of this disease transferring from contained animals (the commercial elk herd) to native Whitetail Deer.  The Peoria Tribe has now participated in an ongoing survey with the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Veterinary Service for three years, and found that no deer in our jurisdiction has tested positive for CWD.  The Peoria Tribe environmental department has requested, by tribal and public news papers and public notices, that any sick or debilitated  Whitetail Deep please be reported  to the closest Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation officer and/or the Peoria Environmental Department.

2012 Anticipated Activities
v  The Peoria Tribe proposes to ascertain 17 samples from tribal lands, but we will collect as many samples beyond 17 as opportunity presents during regular deer hunting seasons..

v  The Peoria Environmental Depart is prepared to sample "road killed" Whitetail deer from the Peoria jurisdictional area, as the opportunity presents, until the end of the grant period of September 30, 2012.

v  The Peoria Environmental Department has provided "Outreach", CWD articles in the Peoria Tribe newsletter and local Miami News Record newspaper,  tribal business committee and general council meetings, and the Peoria Tribe web page.  Also these articles will request tribal members to report any observations of sick deer by contacting the Peoria Environmental Department at the tribal office.

v  The Peoria Environmental Department will also apply to the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Veterinary Service to continue to participate in the 20122 / 2013 CWD monitoring program.

Fish Hatchery Maintenance
BIA
The Peoria Tribe received a small amount of funding from the BIA.  This funding is focused on maintenance and upgrading equipment for the fish hatchery, the most recent money was used to upgrade our freshwater mussel rearing capabilities.  We have submitted a funding request for the coming year, depending on funding appropriate maintenance and upgrade will be accomplished.

 2012 Anticipated Activities
v  Upgrade and maintain equipment at Peoria Tribal Aquatic Center.

Air 103

EPA

The purpose of this grant is to determine the amount of mercury contamination that impacts our Tribal Jurisdiction. The atmospheric mercury is in the primary pollutant from area coal fired generating plants and other industries. The focus will be to collect samples and shipping of the samples to a mercury testing facility. The goal is to contribute to the overall databank of mercury contamination  and the progress of outreach and training.

v  Attended meetings and trainings that are significant to the outcome of this project.

v  Write one article for the Tribal newspaper on air issues that address potential health threats to Tribal and/or community members.

v  Coordinated/assisted  the contractors and laboratory.

v  Submit revised QAPP for sampling.

v  Collected and ship mercury samples.

v  All samples were being analyzed.

v  Submitted a quarterly report to the EPA outlining work completed.

v  Take pictures of sampling site.

v  Submitted a final report to the EPA including copies of all work conducted and the databases.

v  Attend monthly NATURE meeting; to discuss environmental issues that concern area            tribes.

v  Attended Tar Creek Conference

v  QAPP submitted and approved

v  Quarterly reports submitted and extension requested

v  Attended Quapaw Air Conference at Downstream Casino

FIRE PREVENTION GRANT

FEMA

The purpose of this grant, funded by the Federal Emergency Management Agency, is to educate the Native American residents, as well as all residents of Ottawa County. The Peoria Tribe has been working closely with Native American and local fire departments to design an innovative curriculum to prevent fire related deaths in our community. The Fire Prevention and Safety Program designed to educate residents on fire hazards and fire prevention and safety techniques.

2011 work plan deliverables completed
v  Partnership with local Native American fire departments

v  Partnership with local fire departments

v  Partnership with other local tribes

v  Design and purchase of Fire and Safety Trailer

v  Develop an educational program and testing for data

v  Develop an demonstration for the Fire Prevention & Safety

v  Outreach and conduct demonstrations at area schools to educate on fire safety

v  Outreach and conduct demonstrations at local Native American events

v  Outreach and conduct demonstrations at Health Fairs

v  Outreach and conduct demonstrations at local county events

v  Outreach and conduct demonstrations at area senior citizens events

v  Analyze data for education benefits of demonstrations

v  Reach  5,000  residents in Ottawa County

v  Complete quarterly reports.

v  Partnership with local Native American fire departments

v  Partnership with local fire departments

v  Partnership with other local tribes

v  Continue educational program and testing for data

v  Continue outreach and conduct demonstrations at schools, county events, Native American events, Health Fairs, and Senior Activities

v  Analyze testing and data to improve the outreach effort

v  Complete quarterly reports

v  Goal to  reach 5,000  residents in Ottawa County

The goals achieved and grant was completed in December 2011.

 CWA Sections 319

NON-POINT SOURCE POLLUTION GRANT

EPA

This grant will focus on the agricultural NPS pollution subcategories of!) Non-irrigated crop production, 2) pasture land, and 3) stream bank erosion.

The project location is the Peoria Tribe's powwow grounds that are adjacent to unnamed perennial stream. The goal of this project is to reduce the amount of NPS pollution entering the Stream and to increase the quality of the water in the stream. The objectives at the location are:

2012 Anticipated Activities
v  Decrease stream bank erosion

v  Decrease nutrient loading from adjacent lands

v  Slow down the flow of water during periods of high flow

v  Increase the number of native plant species at the location

v  Increase the amount of habitat availability for fish and other aquatic biota

v  Increase the functionality of the powwow ground campsite

v  Increase public awareness about NPS pollution

CWA Section 319 Special Project - NEO

EPA

This project will focus on wetlands development for toxic substance removal and developing nonpoint source educational programs. The Tribe and NEO propose to restore wetlands adjacent to the current channel of Tar Creek. The project will consist of approximately five acres of wetlands and retention pools. This will provide natural means such as retention, plant uptake, additional riparian zones, which will assist in the removal of heavy metals and other contaminants. The second part of our funding focuses on developing a nonpoint source educational program with NEO utilizing the wetlands and retention pools. Other projects will be developed by NEO college staff and will be used as a hand-on education tool where numerous projects can be developed and performed. It will, also, provide students with environmental activates that rain them in the importance of the environment and particularly nonpoint source pollution.
 

2012 Anticipated Activities
v  Decrease heavy metal loading from the watershed

v  Increase the number of native plant species at the location by improving the riparian zones, utilizing plants that will uptake heavy metals

v  Increase the opportunity for hands-on education

v  Increase the availability for scientific experimentation

v  Increase the functionality of the project area

v  Increase public awareness about NPS pollution

v  Increase the amount of habitat availability for fish and other aquatic biota

319 NON POINT SOURCE

Water Grant

EPA

Many NPS pollution categories impair Tribal water quality. However, in the Tribe's NPS Assessment, three have been identified as priority categories; agricultural, resource extraction, and land disposal. The specific sources of NPS pollution are described fully in the NPS Assessment document.

2011 Work Plan Deliverables Completed

v  Development of Phosphorous Index and analysis of future BMP implementation

v  Seek additional funding for BMP Implementation

v  Education of livestock farmers on how to use the PI

v  Development of BMP implementation plan

v  Educate the public on their role in helping to decrease agricultural NPS pollution

v  Monitoring of water sources for changes in water quality as part of 106 Water Grant

v  Public education on the impact of heavy metal contaminated water on the biosphere

2012 Anticipated Activities
v  Plant trees around the parking lots and ponds at tribal lands

v  Continue to seek additional funding for BMP implementation

v  Education of the public on their role in helping to decrease agricultural NPS pollution

v  Continuing of the monitoring of water sources for changes in water quality as part of the 106 Water Grant

v  To educate the Peoria Tribe members on the impact of heavy metal contaminated water on the biosphere through the Newsletter and the Business Committee Rep

NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENT and RESTORATION

BIA

As a Trustee of all Natural Resources impacting Peoria Tribal members, the Peoria Tribe Environmental Department is very active in all ongoing NRDAR (Natural Resource Damage Assessment and Restoration) activities within the Tri-State Mining District Superfund Site (Kansas, Missouri, Oklahoma) and the Tar Creek Superfund Site (Ottawa County, Oklahoma). The effects of past mining operations have caused injury to, and continue to impact natural resources within the Peoria Tribal jurisdiction. This impact includes injury to air, surface and ground water resources, stream biota, wildlife, migratory waterfowl and other avian resources, soil, and vegetative resources.  These resources many times suffer harm from both subsistence and cultural stand-point because of the close affinity Native American people has with the earth and its produce. 

Trusteeship and the very nature of many natural resources, stream flow, the transitory nature of wildlife, migrations of many avian species, etc., is reflected in the Federal Regulatory Legislation that regulate damage assessment and restoration.  These CERCLA  regulations allow for NRD claims to be made for injury to natural resources within Tribal Jurisdiction or resources impacting Tribal Jurisdiction, on or against Potentially Responsible Parties for  their present or past mining activities.  This includes mining activities within and outside that tribal jurisdiction, because certain natural resources are transitory, and because certain contaminants that cause injury are also transient.   Therefore the Peoria Environmental Department continues to be actively involved in the Tri-State Mining District Superfund Site and the Spring River Watershed Coalition, via the Trustee Councils of Tri-State, and the Tar Creek Superfund Site, via the Tar Creek Trustee Council.

As a Natural Resource Trustee the Peoria Tribe, through the Tribal Environmental Department, has, for the year 2011, been active  and continues to be involved in the preparation of, and participation in:

v  Developing a Grand Lake Restoration Compensation Development Plan (ongoing).

v  Developing Peoria Tribe Natural Resource Damage Assessment and Restoration Document (ongoing development).

v  Developed and tabulated a Peoria Tribe Natural Resource Study of aquatic and plant resources used by tribal members for subsistence and recreational purposes.

v  Working to develop a natural resource damage assessment study on a particular resource not previously investigated by USFW, USGS, or other tribal trustees.

v  Assisting in Natural Resource sampling activities and Assessment studies, such as; the Tri-State Gosling Study; the Ozark Cave Fish Study; and Grand Lake Sediment sampling (ongoing activities).

v  Reviewing and commenting on all proposed natural resource studies, such as; the USGS Spring River Overbank Sediments Study; US Fish and Wildlife Service Crayfish Study; Six Treaty Tribe Overbank Study; Six Treaty Tribe Cultural Resource Index Study; Six Treaty Tribe Plant Cultural Resource Index, Tri-State Transition Zone Study (ongoing activities).

v  Review, comment, and development of the Tar Creek Trustee Council Restoration Plan (ongoing development)

v  Investment of Asarco Bankruptcy Settlement Restoration funds;  to be able to have available dollars "project ready", and to secure the safest investment (Federal Treasury Bonds) to be able to extend "dollars to put on the Ground",  those restoration dollars.

v  Attend and participate in USEPA Remediation meetings and conference calls as possible.

v  Provided letters of concern and comments on EPA remediation actions, i.e., EPA Chat Repository, EPA Hydro-geologic study.

v  Attend and participate in all Tar Creek Trustee Council meetings

v  Attend and participate in all Trustee Councils of Tri-State meetings.

v  Attend and participate in all Spring River Watershed meetings.

v  Attend and participate in NATURE meetings as possible

v  Attend Tar Creek Conference functions.

v  Attend and participate in the Department of the Interior, Natural Resource Damage Assessment and Restoration National Workshop.

v  Secured Tribal Legal Representation, apart from U.S. D.O.I. and U.S. D.O.J., and currently developing future NRDAR actions.   This is in harmony with U.S. Federal Regulations, and is at no cost to the Peoria Tribe.

v  Worked with DOI in securing two year extension on Grand Lake Tolling Agreement to further Tar Creek Trustee Council claim development.

v  Working with DOI to provide a "Letter of Intent" including a "Degree of Liability" and a "NRDAR Claim Assessment Value" to five PRPs (Potentially Responsible Parties), for mining related injury to the Grand Lake Watershed.

v  Participate in monthly Tribal / DOI, NRDAR Concerns conference call (nation-wide call).

v  Developing and positioning the Peoria Tribe Aquatic Facility, Endangered Fish and Mussel Species capabilities, for restoration activities and projects associated with the Tri-State Mining District / Tar Creek Superfund sites, and for production of a fish "Replacement Equivalency" species (in accord with the provisions of CERCLA)  in lieu of the lost services of  injured fish species.

2012 ANTICIPATED ACTIVITIES
NRDAR is an ongoing activity in the Tri-State Mining District, Tar Creek Superfund
Site, Spring River Watershed, Neosho River Watershed, and the Grand Lake Basin.  Also USEPA remediation activities are ongoing in these areas for the unforeseeable future, particularly in OU4 (Operable Unit 4 Superfund site) and upcoming OU5, (which will include all of Spring River Watershed).  Because restoration activities can only be undertaken as specific EPA remediation activities are effected, Peoria Tribal participation in NRDAR (Natural Resource Damage Assessment and Restoration) activities will continue for the year 2012 with the ongoing activities listed above.  Some associated legal activities may undergo changes recommended by the legal counsel that has been employed by the Peoria Tribe.  Other exceptions could or will be the addition of new or more delineated natural resource studies, the study of culturally specific natural resources and injury determination there-of, and the change or adjustment of EPA remediation efforts.  Also included in adjustments or changes to the above list could be; mediation or litigation activities with PRPs (Potentially Responsible Parties), and Restoration Projects that might be undertaken with Asarco Restoration dollars already received.

Submitted by:

Jim Dixon

Environmental Director

118 S. Eight Tribes Trail
P.O. Box 1527
Miami, Oklahoma 74355
918.540.2535 Telephone 918.540.2538 Fax